Losing Lance – Part II

Losing Lance – Part II

There were numerous obstacles swirling through Lance Armstrong’s mind, helping to create non-self-empowering choices, even though he, himself, admitted to feeling, “invincible”.  Above the obvious uber-competitiveness to win at all costs is the more subtle yet very destructive need to control.

Armstrong’s self-defeating choices were developed and honed as a child.  When asked about his need to control he admitted to having a “fighter” mentality, and both he and his mother, due to life circumstances, when pushed against the wall, would come out swinging.  “So, you were like this as a child, ten, eleven years old?” Oprah asked.  Armstrong’s response was affirmative.  Ten-year-old Armstrong was in desperate need of a course of action, promoting positive choices that are self-empowering, like TURNING STONEchoice.  Perhaps the adult before the public eye would have made different choices if given the opportunity as a child to learn positive choice making goes beyond a basic understanding of right and wrong. 

He expressed, “I wanted to control the outcome and the narrative” (surrounding the allegations of doping and win).  When he could not control others from speaking the truth, he engaged in bullying behavior.  “When threatened, I attack”, he stated.   

 The Turning Stone Process encourages interaction over reaction and explains the idea to control people or circumstances is an illusion, and the only person one is able to control is oneself.   Control is a mind fear that results in non-self-empowering choices like bullying others to keep a lie intact.

For more information on TURNING STONEchoice and its process, visit www.turningstonechoice.com

 

~Sammy @TURNING STONEchoice

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