Martin was a Man

dr-martin-luther-king-jr-and-children-on-swingWhat else could possibly be written about the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King that has not already been put into print? How about the fact that he smoked cigarettes? Not exactly a ringing endorsement of sainthood or a picturesque frame for “the legend.” It’s not the information we share with our students, but, perhaps, we should. Truth is, Martin was a man that breathed in air like you and me, experienced doubt and fear, and, I’m sure, if we asked his wife, had his flaws. This is the time we honor and reflect upon his legacy and the civil rights movement, and I would never attempt to belittle his contributions to our society from which all Americans have benefited. However, I think some of us get wrapped up in “the legend” and forget about his humanity. When I think of his courage, strength, intelligence, and ultimate sacrifice, I am both inspired and intimidated. Simply reflecting on “the legend” can cripple our resolve and bathe us in self-doubt when comparing our service to his. In turn, this prevents us from continuing the work he began, because–well–we might not feel empowered to act because of fear of failure. We may never have high-profile platforms from which to speak, but our words do have weight, and our silence even more. We may even feel disconnected or overwhelmed by the social ills that swirl around us every day, justifying inaction in a variety of ways, but we do have power in our spheres of influence. The bottom line is, we need not start a revolution in order to empower others and ourselves, but, as individuals, we can and should continue Martin’s work by becoming aware of and diligently speaking out against injustice whenever we witness its occurrence in our own little worlds. Let not the mind obstacle of fear prevent us from moving forward. In Martin’s own words, “Never, never be afraid to do what’s right, especially if the well-being of a person or animal is at stake. Society’s punishments are small compared to the wounds we inflict on our soul when we look the other way.”

~Sammy @TURNING STONEchoice
For more information on TURNING STONEchoice and its process, visit http://www.turningstonechoice.com

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One thought on “Martin was a Man

  1. llfdennis says:

    This article makes an important point. We may not have the pulpit, public stature, or resources that Martin used to promote civil rights and combat the many evils of racism, but we can begin where we are, within our own, little circles, and do what we can to further liberty and justice for all.

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